One of the most useful articles I’ve put into practice from Spear Digest is Dr. Andy Cohen’s on reduction of white spot lesions using MI paste. To date, it’s been the most effective treatment modality I’ve had for dealing with fluorosis stains, white spot lesions and decalcified spots.

Recently I started implementing DMG's ICON treatment. It’s resin infiltration that “fills in” the de-calcified areas leading to the white spots. I haven’t been this excited about an easy procedure with impressive results in a long time. It uses micro-invasive infiltration technology to treat smooth surface and proximal carious lesions, and I recently used it on my dental assistant’s white spot lesions on 8 and 9 with impressive results.

This product has been around for a while, so I was surprised I hadn’t heard of it sooner. I came across it via Instagram, and contacted my DMG rep. I’ll walk you through the protocol and show you an example of the impressive results I achieved on my assistant.

DMG Icon treatment for white spot lesions

Use either a latex rubber dam (if the lesions are close to the gingiva, as is the case with many post-ortho lesions) or an Optragate. Do not use a non-latex dam. If you place an Optragate, you can use a liquid rubber dam and light cure if needed to protect the tissue. 

polishing surface of white spot lesions

In order to prepare the surfaces for infiltration, micro-air abrade the surface of the lesions or polish with a disk. Use pummice to clean the lesions to be treated.

You’ll then use the 15 percent HCL etchant that comes in the ICON kit for a 2 minute etch. With fluorosis stains, you can etch up to 3 minutes. This seems like a lot, but you haven’t drilled into the teeth, so you are in enamel and in a safe zone for extended etching.

Rinse for a full 30 seconds, then dry thoroughly.

You are going to repeat the above steps and again disk or air abrade, etch, rinse and dry.

After the second etch, the teeth should be very chalky. 

abrade etch rinse dry white spot lesion tooth

You’ll then place ethanol on the lesions, (Icon dry in the kit) which gives you a “preview” of the final result. If you have good esthetics with the Icon dry, you are good to go with the infiltration. If there isn’t a change, or you see a suboptimal change, you haven’t accessed the lesion and you need to etch again.

place ethanol on white spot lesions

After you have placed the Icon dry, if you are proceeding with the infiltration, dry the area, then use the infiltration resin in the kit to wet the area for a three-minute infiltration. If, during the three minutes, the resin is no longer visible and shiny, add additional resin. The resin is being absorbed during this time and you may need to apply it additional times, especially for larger lesions.

After the three minutes have passed, remove the excess with cotton pellets and light cure for 40 seconds per tooth.

After resin infiltration is completed, floss the proximal contacts to remove any flash.

Before wetting the teeth, do an additional minute of resin infiltration. This is your “insurance policy” to be sure that your initial infiltration fills all of the micropores in the tooth. You will then need an additional 40 second cure. 

fill micropores for white spot lesions

After the resin is complete, you’ll need to finish and polish with the same tools you would use to smooth and finish a typical anterior composite.

This should be a fantastic new treatment to implement in your practice if you aren’t already using it. The typical cost of this treatment seems to run around the price of a single surface composite on one tooth, and you can determine a “case fee” depending on how many teeth are involved.

The total treatment is only around 15 minutes for two teeth in my office, and we book 30 minutes start-to-finish for the patient. You can order the product through your regular supply rep, and it’s very inexpensive for how many teeth can be treated with one kit. Happy white spot removal!

(Click this link for more dentistry articles by Dr. Courtney Lavigne.)

Courtney Lavigne, D.M.D., Spear Visiting Faculty and Contributing Author - http://www.courtneylavigne.com


Comments

Alex B.
July 28th, 2017
I love the results too! But how long does it last? I'm wondering if brushing removes it over time. I had a patient return for a touch up after a few months.
Courtney L.
August 5th, 2017
Hey Alex! This technique is new to me so I can't share with you years of follow up. However, based on the way the technique works via infiltration, the only reason you should need to do a second round of treatment is if you didn't get complete results the first time and when the teeth rehydrate you see discrepancies. The best way I think you can evaluate the success of it is to use water after etching to see a preliminary result and decide if an additional etching round is necessary. I contacted DMG and when applied correctly there shouldn't need to be touch ups unless it's improvement of the results! Hope that helps!