This bridge has been in place for about 20 years. The patient is beginning a comprehensive course of treatment and we are getting ready for ortho so I cut off the old bridge to reprovisionalize and see how the tissue responds. We just want to be sure that we can move teeth with healthy tissue. The bridge popped off easily and I noted that there was no cement in the canine abutment in the prosthesis. It fit very poorly, thus the cause of the inflammation. I just didn’t expect the inflammation to look like this! This tissue had grown under the crown and had completely covered the preparation.  It was difficult to laser it away and then provisionalize. It did, however, result in a much healthier situation!


Comments

Commenter's Profile Image Steven Kendrick
February 24th, 2010
unbelievable! When I first saw the photo I thought it was duralay!
Commenter's Profile Image Barry Polansky
February 24th, 2010
Never know what you're going to find in the Cracker Jacks box. Great picture -- usually I just find massive decay -- even when there's just a tiny hole in a crown.
Commenter's Profile Image Steve Ratcliff
February 24th, 2010
Wild, hunh? The black line on the facial is where the bur hit the tissue. It started bleeding profusely and I wondered how the pulp could possibly be so close to the surface!
Commenter's Profile Image Barry Polansky
February 24th, 2010
Think it was a form of this: What is it? An uncommon and specific type of inflammatory hyperplasia reaction to deep caries in a young tooth in which an inflamed pulp extends through a large carious lesion; usually associated with a nonvital tooth.